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Canada Reaffirms Legality of All Same-Sex Marriage

In a dramatic turnaround that happened in scarcely more than 24 hours, the government of Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper has repudiated a Justice Department brief that had threatened the validity of thousands of marriages by US same-sex couples there. Comment

Ron Paul’s Anti-Gay Record Strong, Not Absolute

As Ron Paul’s profile has risen during the Republican primaries, the charges that he is an anti-gay bigot have grown more pointed on gay blogs, while a few voices, notably blogger Andrew Sullivan, have expressed support for the 76-year-old — in the GOP contest, at least. Comments (3)

Quinn's Fundraising for Mayoral Primary Complete

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, the out lesbian Chelsea Democrat, has now raised more than $4.9 million for an expected 2013 mayoral run, the maximum she can use in her party’s primary. Comment

Canadian Government Brief Threatens Validity of Foreign Marriages

In a startling development that could affect thousands of US same-sex couples, the government of Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper has argued that marriages by couples from jurisdictions where such unions would not be legal are not valid in Canada either. Comment

Chinese lovers, Jewish mothers and outside others

BY JERRY TALLMER / “Outside people” are what we non-Chinese are to the Chinese — even when (or especially when) we sleep with them, maybe fall in love with them — and that is what this play is all about. Comment

Winter’s chill warmed by hot Downtown theater

BY TRAV S.D. / Happy New Year! Notice the difference? Okay, there isn’t any — but that doesn’t mean we can’t all take a minute to breathe, get our bearings and collect ourselves before jumping back into the rat race. A little rest and recreation! While it’s too freezing to play Frisbee in the park, might I suggest what’s in a few Downtown theatres? Comment

Just Do Art!

Just Do Art! Comment

Mitt's Myths

Politicians, particularly in the heat of an election contest, often fudge the facts. That’s no surprise, and there is no end of media outlets and advocacy groups — of varying reliability, to be sure — who put on a full court press ferreting out the “truthiness” of debate pronouncements, stump speeche Comment

Double Murderer’s Appeal Gets Skeptical Hearing 

Judges on the Court of Appeals, New York State's highest bench, seemed unconvinced that the rights of a convicted killer of two gay men were violated when evidence from the first killing was used during his trial for the second killing. Comment

A Cautionary Surrogacy Tale

Facing legal questions for which no New Jersey precedent yet existed, Superior Court Judge Francis B. Schultz, on December 13, awarded the father of twin girls conceived through gestational surrogacy sole custody of the two five-year-olds. Comments (3)

Julius' Closed, For Now

Julius’, a West Tenth Street gay bar that dates as a tavern to 1864 and played an iconic role in the history of opening up public spaces to homosexuals, has been shuttered by the city health department for code violations. Comment

Rick Santorum’s Anti-Gay Evolution

In fairness to Rick Santorum, he did not equate homosexuality with bestiality and pedophilia in a 2003 interview when he was commenting on Lawrence v. Texas, the US Supreme Court decision that struck down sodomy laws across the country. Comment

Into the Woods

BY STEVE ERICKSON / Jean-Luc Godard once said, “All you need to make a movie is a girl and a gun.” Comment

The Aggies, and Now the Eddies

BY DAVID NOH / “I been wonderin’ why you been sniffin’ round the plantation ever since Miss Mi-riam arrived!” was Agnes Moorehead’s immortally snarled line as that cherishable harridan Velma Carruthers in “Hush, Hush Sweet Charlotte,” and I, too, have been sniffing through 2011’s cultural events to come up again with my annual Aggies, named for the ultimate character actress. Comment

Verdi and Handel

BY DAVID SHENGOLD / On November 17, many vocal fanatics — a/k/a opera queens — found their way to the Met’s final seasonal performance of “Nabucco,” Verdi’s blazing Babylonian epic. Two cast members had joined an uneven team made up of highly adequate Zeljko Lucic, sadly inadequate Carlo Colombara, and handsome, ringing-toned but dangerously forcing Younghoon Lee. Comment

A Hint of Politics to Come

BY STEVE ERICKSON / Soon after the Occupy Wall Street movement got underway, an organization called Occupy Cinema appeared downtown. It started by programming a screening of Peter Watkins’ 1971 New Left classic “Punishment Park” Zuccotti Park in mid-November. Comment

Defendant Takes Stand in Edgard Mercado Killing

The accused killer of Edgard Mercado told a Manhattan jury that the 39-year-old gay man wanted to be strangled with a rope during sex and that the death was accidental. Comment

Criminally Negligent Homicide Sought by Davawn Robinson‚ Lawyer

Saying her client never intended to kill Edgard Mercado when he strangled him to death in 2009, a defense attorney for Davawn Robinson asked a Manhattan jury to convict the 24-year-old of criminally negligent homicide. Comment

Us, In All Our Glory

Us, In All Our Glory|Brooklyn Museum's "Hide/ Seek": a total queer revelation Comment

The Observer

I have never told an interviewee, “I’m grateful that you’re alive,” but that’s exactly what I did when I met writer Alan Hollinghurst at the Helmsley Hotel. His new novel, “The Stranger’s Child,” is his fifth, and I feel that I’ve grown up with him through all of them, every one of which has been marked by his pellucid gay sensibility, radiantly expressive prose, breathtaking turns of phrase and observations, and wonderfully pointed wit. Comment

Bar Codes

BY DAVID KENNERLEY / As you enter the tiny Paradise Factory Theatre to see “Accidentally, Like a Martyr,” you may think, for a brief moment, that you’ve made a wrong turn and ended up in a gay dive bar. That’s because the performance space has been transformed into a convincing facsimile of a decrepit watering hole, complete with moldy disco music. And those shadowy male figures conversing and sipping drinks? They’re actors. Comment

Murder Case Against Davawn Robinson Ends in Mistrial

After seven days of deliberation, by which time the frustrations of jurors, the defense, and the judge were playing out in open court, a mistrial was declared in the trial of Davawn Robinson for the 2009 killing of Edgard Mercado. Comment

All Jonas, All the Time

BY ELI JACOBSON / For a 30-year period that ended in 2007, the Metropolitan Opera was the house of the two tenors — Domingo and Pavarotti. The septuagenarian Domingo retains his place but has relinquished his old repertory. However, the next Pavarotti was needed long before the great Italian tenor left this earth. Comment

Administration One-Two Punch for Global Rights

In a remarkable tandem show of support for global LGBT rights, President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton marked International Human Rights Day with a comprehensive executive order to federal agencies engaged in foreign countries and a major address on the universal legitimacy of demands for equality and dignity. Comment

Occupy The Armory!

New Yorkers may have to wait a little while to see Elizabeth Streb’s Extreme Action daredevils scale and drop from the Brooklyn Bridge, but in the meantime, the Park Avenue Armory’s 55,000-square-foot, 70-foot-high Wade Thompson Drill Hall will provide ample room for the master’s explorations of gravity, velocity, trajectory, distance, size, connectivity, and impact in a spectacle aptly named “Kiss The Air!” Comment

A Familiar Arc Freshly Drawn

BY GARY M. KRAMER / The coming out and coming-of age story gets a welcome new voice in Dee Rees’ very fine feature “Pariah,” based on her 2007 film short of the same name. Comment

After Five Days, Davawn Robinson Jury Still Deadlocked

Late in their fifth day of deliberations, a Manhattan jury once again told Judge Daniel P. FitzGerald they were deadlocked in their deliberations over second-degree murder charges against Davawn Robinson in the 2009 strangling death of Edgard Mercado, a 39-year-old gay man. Comment

Novelist Julia Leigh explores female desire with the coin of the cinematic realm

Since the ‘50s, art cinema and sex have gone hand in hand. Back then, the commercial success of Ingmar Bergman’s “Summer with Monika” didn’t owe nearly as much to its prescient depiction of frustrated, rebellious youth or to praise from François Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard as to its brief glimpse of female nudity, which seems quite tame now. Comments (1)

Congress Restores Needle Exchange Ban

In its vote last week to keep the government from shutting down, Congress barred the appropriation of federal funds to support syringe exchange programs, reinstating an earlier ban that was repealed in 2009. Comment

Winds of Change

BY CHRISTOPHER BYRNE / It is no accident or mere caprice that prompted Michael Mayer to place his engaging new revival and revision of “On A Clear Day You Can See Forever” in 1974. One year earlier, the American Psychiatric Association had removed homosexuality from its list of mental illnesses, causing a storm of controversy that would last until its permanent removal in 1986. Comment

ExpressJet Anti-Gay Workplace Verdict Upheld

The Maine Supreme Judicial Court, that state’s highest bench, in a December 6 ruling, affirmed a half-million dollar damages award to Edward Russell, who persuaded a jury he suffered employment discrimination based on his sexual orientation, which is a violation of the state’s Human Rights Act. Comment

Book Worms

Theresa Rebeck is on a roll. The Brooklyn-based writer has had more than a dozen plays produced in New York to ample acclaim, including “The Understudy” and her 2007 Broadway debut, “Mauritius.” Equally at home working in television, she’s written and produced episodes of “Law & Order: Criminal Intent” and is the creator and head writer of “Smash,” the wildly anticipated NBC series about staging a Broadway hit. Comment

Love! Valour! Confusion!

“Friends and Relations,” the comedic drama about a circle of gay friends that spins out of control, shares a tender kinship with Terrence McNally’s work. The unapologetic, warts-and-all portrayal of the elastic, often strained bonds among seven gay men recalls “Love! Valour! Compassion!” Attempting to chronicle New York’s 1970s sex and drug-fueled scene that gets quashed by the AIDS epidemic in the ‘80s, the play echoes the epic sweep of “Some Men.” Comment

The Marriage-Go-Round

Marriage in Noel Coward’s plays is no fairytale. As a gay man, marriage for Coward in real life was unthinkable in 1930, and so he took the role left to him — that of a gimlet-eyed outsider who devoted himself to skewering the conventions and accepted artifice of the conventional marriage state, which when fueled by alcohol, selfishness, but also wit, create a mix too volatile not to combust. Comment

Film Too Heavily Accented

Steven Spielberg’s work tends to oscillate between brutality and sentimentality, sometimes within the same film. Comment

Film Too Heavily Accented

BY STEVE ERICKSON / Steven Spielberg’s work tends to oscillate between brutality and sentimentality, sometimes within the same film. Comment

Winds of Change

It is no accident or mere caprice that prompted Michael Mayer to place his engaging new revival and revision of “On A Clear Day You Can See Forever” in 1974. One year earlier, the American Psychiatric Association had removed homosexuality from its list of mental illnesses, causing a storm of controversy that would last until its permanent removal in 1986. Comment

Book Worms

BY DAVID KENNERLEY / Theresa Rebeck is on a roll. The Brooklyn-based writer has had more than a dozen plays produced in New York to ample acclaim, including “The Understudy” and her 2007 Broadway debut, “Mauritius.” Equally at home working in television, she’s written and produced episodes of “Law & Order: Criminal Intent” and is the creator and head writer of “Smash,” the wildly anticipated NBC series about staging a Broadway hit. Comments (1)

Bar Codes

As you enter the tiny Paradise Factory Theatre to see “Accidentally, Like a Martyr,” you may think, for a brief moment, that you’ve made a wrong turn and ended up in a gay dive bar. That’s because the performance space has been transformed into a convincing facsimile of a decrepit watering hole, complete with moldy disco music. And those shadowy male figures conversing and sipping drinks? They’re actors. Comment

The Aggies, and Now the Eddies

BY DAVID NOH / “I been wonderin’ why you been sniffin’ round the plantation ever since Miss Mi-riam arrived!” was Agnes Moorehead’s immortally snarled line as that cherishable harridan Velma Carruthers in “Hush, Hush Sweet Charlotte,” and I, too, have been sniffing through 2011’s cultural events to come up again with my annual Aggies, named for the ultimate character actress. Comment

Verdi and Handel

BY DAVID SHENGOLD / On November 17, many vocal fanatics — a/k/a opera queens — found their way to the Met’s final seasonal performance of “Nabucco,” Verdi’s blazing Babylonian epic. Two cast members had joined an uneven team made up of highly adequate Zeljko Lucic, sadly inadequate Carlo Colombara, and handsome, ringing-toned but dangerously forcing Younghoon Lee. Comment

A Hint of Politics to Come

Soon after the Occupy Wall Street movement got underway, an organization called Occupy Cinema appeared downtown. It started by programming a screening of Peter Watkins’ 1971 New Left classic “Punishment Park” Zuccotti Park in mid-November. Comment

Myths and Misses

Reading Aristophanes today, one doesn’t instantly think “rollicking comedy,” yet that’s what it was in ancient Greece where the putative father of comedy left his audiences helpless with mirth, or so we think. Stephen Sondheim turned to Aristophanes for “The Frogs,” an insightful and intelligent modernization of that text. Comment

Verdi and Handel

On November 17, many vocal fanatics — a/k/a opera queens — found their way to the Met’s final seasonal performance of “Nabucco,” Verdi’s blazing Babylonian epic. Two cast members had joined an uneven team made up of highly adequate Zeljko Lucic, sadly inadequate Carlo Colombara, and handsome, ringing-toned but dangerously forcing Younghoon Lee. Comment

Myths and Misses

BY CHRISTOPHER BYRNE / Reading Aristophanes today, one doesn’t instantly think “rollicking comedy,” yet that’s what it was in ancient Greece where the putative father of comedy left his audiences helpless with mirth, or so we think. Stephen Sondheim turned to Aristophanes for “The Frogs,” an insightful and intelligent modernization of that text. Comment

The Aggies, and Now the Eddies

“I been wonderin’ why you been sniffin’ round the plantation ever since Miss Mi-riam arrived!” was Agnes Moorehead’s immortally snarled line as that cherishable harridan Velma Carruthers in “Hush, Hush Sweet Charlotte,” and I, too, have been sniffing through 2011’s cultural events to come up again with my annual Aggies, named for the ultimate character actress. Comment

A Hint of Politics to Come

BY STEVE ERICKSON / Soon after the Occupy Wall Street movement got underway, an organization called Occupy Cinema appeared downtown. It started by programming a screening of Peter Watkins’ 1971 New Left classic “Punishment Park” Zuccotti Park in mid-November. Comment

My Queer Friend Christopher Hitchens

Over the holidays, I read gay British novelist Alan Hollinghurst’s fine new novel, “The Stranger’s Child.” The winner of Britain’s most prestigious literary award, the Booker Prize, for his 2004 novel “The Line of Beauty,” Hollinghurst is incapable of writing prose that is l Comments (13)

Stylized Aches

Stylized Aches|“Norwegian Wood” is visually stunning, emotionally resonant Comment

The Aggies, and Now the Eddies

The Aggies, and Now the Eddies|Agnes Moorehead, Edmund Goulding inspire best of 2011 Comment

Verdi and Handel

BY DAVID SHENGOLD Comment

Florida Court Finds Child Has Two Moms

Ruling on December 23, a Florida appeals court, deciding an issue for which no state precedent existed, found that a child born through in vitro fertilization using an ovum from its birth mother’s same-sex partner, is legally the child of both women. Comment

Myths and Misses

BY CHRISTOPHER BYRNE Comment

Advocates Press Cuomo on Homeless Youth

In a state operating budget of more than $85 billion, the money at issue might ostensibly be only $1.5 million, but that doesn’t mean a new push by advocates for homeless youth in New York City has no potential for getting under the skin of Cuomo administration officials. Comment

Subtly Out of Tehran

BY STEVE ERICKSON Comment

Can a Gay Socialist Save Belgium?

When Elio Di Rupo was named Belgium’s prime minister on December 5, it was an historic first because he became the first openly gay head of government in a European Union nation. Comment

Bar Codes

BY DAVID KENNERLEY Comment

Anti-Gay Counseling Grad Student Loses

A federal appeals court has upheld a lower court’s refusal to grant a preliminary injunction relieving a school counseling master’s degree candidate at a Georgia public university from having to participate in a “remediation” program on LGBTQ issues prior to enrolling in a clinical practicum in which she would carry out one-on-one counseling with actual public school youth. Comments (1)

Winds of Change

BY CHRISTOPHER BYRNE Comment

Book Worms

BY DAVID KENNERLEY Comments (1)

Michael Sabatino Inaugurated in Yonkers

In January 1 inauguration ceremonies in Yonkers, Michael Sabatino, Jr., became the first openly LGBT officeholder in that city’s history. Comment

Oops! Ricky Martin's Rep Denies Marriage Report

A representative for Ricky Martin has denied that the pop singer plans to marry his partner, economist Carlos Gonzalez Abella, in New York on January 28. Comment

Passive Resistance in the New Year

Surprisingly, I’m a little sorry to see the old year disappear. Sure, it had a few holes, was a little frayed around the collar and cuffs, but I could have stretched it out a bit longer, then pieced it into a quilt or something. But poof. It’s gone. Comment

Coming and Going

"Shame,” directed by Steve McQueen (“Hunger”), aims to be an intense character study of Brandon (Michael Fassbender), a sex addict with intimacy issues. In fact, the film, which is getting buzz — and an NC-17 rating — for its sexual content, is not really about anything. Comments (1)

Who‚ Äôs Afraid of Penelope Longstreet?

This may be a perverse thing to say, but “Carnage” is so entertaining that it weakens its central argument. It plays like Edward Albee’s classic “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” rewritten by the staff of “Frasier” into something a little less threatening. Comment

Supporting A Mission No Less Urgent

As we begin the New Year, it’s gratifying to look back on the astonishing victory last June of marriage equality. Backed by a crack team of advocates, the extraordinary leadership of Governor Andrew Cuomo, and the courage of four Republican state senators who joined 29 of their 30 Democratic colleagues, victory was secured in the first six months of a new administration in Albany. Comment

Linda, Bunny & Liz

Linda Lavin, besides being one of the great theatrical presences of our time, has always sung. She makes that point abundantly clear with her new CD, “Possibilities” (Ghostlight/ Sh-k-boom), which she debuted at Birdland on December 5. It’s a swinging conglomeration of some of my favorite songs ever written, including Jobim’s “Quiet Nights” and Mancini’s “Two for the Road” –– which will certainly be my wedding theme if I ever… Comment

Hugh‚ Jack

Broadway Cares/ Equity Fights AIDS’ Gypsy of the Year competition (December 6) was a sensational success, breaking previous records by taking in nearly $4.9 million. Comment

Dead Iraqis Occupy Wall Street

With the war in Iraq now officially over and the Occupy Wall Street movement less visible, life in New York was expected to return to normal. Instead, several recent passersby in Manhattan’s financial district have reported seeing thousands of deceased Iraqi civilians taking up residence at Zuccotti Park. The park served for two months in the fall of 2011 as a protest base for thousands of OWS activists. Comment

Letters to the Editor

GOODBYE, AND GOOD RIDDANCE! Comment

Letters to the Editor

WHAT GOOD FOR THE GOOSE. Comment

Letters to the Editor

THE CHOICE IS CLEAR Comment

Defense in Edgard Mercado Death May Claim Accident

The defense in the trial of Davawn Robinson, the accused killer of Edgard Mercado, may argue that Mercado’s 2009 death resulted from an accidental strangulation while the two men were having sex. Comment

DA Push Back On Mercado Killing 'Accident' Defense

As the friends and a family member of Edgard Mercado wept, prosecutors told a Manhattan jury that the evidence would prove that Davawn Robinson meant to kill the 39-year-old gay man when he strangled him in Mercado’s East Village apartment in 2009. Comment

After Lengthy Forensic Testimony, DA Rests in Edgard Mercado Murder

Testifying for the prosecution in the murder trial of Davawn Robinson, a forensic pathologist from the city medical examiner’s office told a Manhattan jury that the injuries on Edgard Mercado’s body showed he had been in a fight. Comment

George Weber's Murderer Gets Maximum Sentence

After a very brief statement in which he said he was “sorry” for killing George Weber and felt “regret” for the pain he caused the slain man’s family, John Katehis received the maximum sentence of 25 years to life in prison. Comments (2)

Pinkwashing’s Complicated Context

Israel is known as the most advanced country in the Middle East on LGBT rights issues. It has openly gay politicians, a parade and bars in Tel Aviv, open service in the military, and a burgeoning queer film and arts scene. This positive atmosphere, however, is largely useful only if you happen to be Jewish and are living on a certain side of the West Bank separation wall. Comment

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