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Insult Comedy… Without the Laughs

The title of out gay writer and director Drew Tobia’s frustration comedy “See You Next Tuesday” is a play on a particular word that causes women to bristle. In one exchange in the film, a friendly co-worker drops the c-word in front of Mona (Eleanore Pienta) and quickly apologizes. Mona responds just as fast, “Cunt, cunt, cunt,” taking the sting out of the term. Comment

Silk Stockings and the World’s Greatest Museums   

The Upper East Side’s Fifth Avenue mansions were once occupied by families named Carnegie, Whitney, Pulitzer, and Vanderbilt. In time, large but swanky apartment houses in the neighborhood bolstered the impression of old money, as did the Ivy-League-type private schools such as Chapin and Dalton. Locals and tourists alike cherish the area’s world- Comment

Shoppers Without Borders: Curing Media-Inflicted War Wounds

Paige Turner, a 29-year-old graduate of Grinnell College’s creative writing program, came to New York to start her life as a novelist. She got some gigs chronicling upscale Manhattan lifestyles for glossy magazines: “good background for my first socially conscious bestseller!” Things were going great — she was online most of the day, researching fashion stories. Then she started to feel “awful” from coming across videos and news photos depicting Palestinian civilians dying under Israeli bombings. Paige developed a massive writer’s block. Comments (1)

Nellie’s Billy

One of the great enigmas in the music world, William Lee “Billy” Tipton (1914 – 1989) was an American jazz musician and bandleader, who, it was discovered after his death, was born a woman. Named Dorothy Louise Tipton at birth in Oklahoma, he took his father’s name, “Billy,” when he started his music career and bound his bre Comments (2)

Marginally Mozart, Masterfully Mark Morris

Handel’s pastoral masterpiece “Acis and Galatea” started out in 1718 as an English masque based on a theme from Ovid’s “Metamorphoses,” and evolved i Comment

Allies Aren’t Enough In Ferguson, San Fran

Another unarmed black man is shot by a white cop, and as the situation explodes, plenty of right-thinking white folks are exhorting each of us blanquitos to become an ally. It’s also what straight folks are supposed to become when another fag gets beaten, another transwoman mutilated and killed. Or a dyke gets raped. Comment

An Upper West Side Liberal Living Legend

BY DAVID NOH | Living for years on the Upper West Side where she was born is a woman who is something of a living legend. Lee Grant’s life has encompassed so incredibly many facets, spanning her own New York Jewish roots, a debut with the Metropolitan Opera at the age of four, and a segue from Comment

No Hobby Lobby Out for Upstate "Wedding Barn"

The New York State Division of Human Rights (DHR) has found that a rural wedding venue that denied a lesbian couple use of its facility violated the state’s Human Rights Law. In the August 8 ruling –– first reported in the Albany Times Union –– Acting Commissioner Helen Diane Foster formally adopted a recommendation by Migdalia Pares, an administrative law judge, that the two women receive $1,500 each in compensatory damages and the venue, Liberty Ridge Farm in Schaghticoke, located between Albany and Saratoga Springs, pay the state a fine of $10,000. Comments (3)

A Flailing Defense Effort by Alleged Anti-Gay Killer 

Suggesting that the defense is in serious trouble, the accused killer of Mark Carson is on his third attorney in roughly 15 months, has filed a letter and two of his own motions with the judge in the case, and even considered representing himself at his trial for Carson’s 2013 homicide. Comment

The Complicated Business of Intimacy

BY GARY M. KRAMER | Love Is Strange,” a thoughtful, wistful film from director and co-writer Ira Sachs, concerns a couple — George (Alfred Molina) and Ben (John Lithgow) — who have been together 39 years. The men marry in the opening moments, bu Comments (2)

America’s Top 50 LGBT-Friendly Colleges & Universities

It’s fairly commonplace for students to travel out of state to attend college these days. A distant school may provide the best course of study for a particular interest or it may offer overall excellence not available closer to home. Maybe a school els Comments (12)

State Moving on its PrEP Drive    

While AIDS groups want a task force to write the plan that will reduce new HIV infections in New York from its current 3,400 a year to 730 annually by 2020, the Cuomo administration is moving ah Comments (1)

With Guns Instead of Games, What About Russia's Gays?

A year ago, world attention on Russia focused on two things –– the impending Winter Olympics in Sochi and new legislation that, under the guise of preventing “homosexual propaganda” targeting children, in fact was the leading edge in a legal and extralegal assault on that nation’s LGBT community. Thanks to the efforts of activists worldwide, those two issues were often intertwined, with calls for boycotting t Comments (16)

Long String of Victories Broken as Tennessee Judge Rules Against Marriage Recognition

Breaking a string of roughly three dozen affirmative marriage equality rulings by federal and state judges, a Tennessee state judge denied a divorce to two gay men saying he had to reject a federal constitutional claim for marriage recognition because of a 1972 US Supreme Court ruling and the “public policy exception” to the Constitution's Full Faith and Credit requirement. Comments (1)

Young Adults Get to Grow Up

Over the past 10 years, French director Philippe Garrel’s work has finally achieved steady, even if marginal US distribution. He made his first short 50 years ago, but it took him decades to get any kind of serious recognition outside France. To some extent, that can be expl Comment

Nature Studies

John Lithgow (foreground) in The Public Theater’s free Shakespeare in the Park production of King Lear, directed by Daniel Sullivan with scenic design by John Lee Beatty, running at the Delacorte […] Comments (1)

Nature Studies

BY CHRISTOPHER BYRNE | Nature is so strong a theme in both the poetry and plot of “King Lear” that at first it’s surprising to walk into Central Park’s Delacorte Theater an Comment

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