Sections

Arts

Shen Wei Takes on the Great Indoors

In his native China, Shen Wei was known for prodigious dancing, which combined strong Western modern technique with what he learned as a child from traditional Chinese Opera. A founding member of the Guangdong Modern Dance Company, China’s first such troupe, he came to America in 1995. Comment
Nightlife

Occupy The Armory!

New Yorkers may have to wait a little while to see Elizabeth Streb’s Extreme Action daredevils scale and drop from the Brooklyn Bridge, but in the meantime, the Park Avenue Armory’s 55,000-square-foot, 70-foot-high Wade Thompson Drill Hall will provide ample room for the master’s explorations of gravity, velocity, trajectory, distance, size, connectivity, and impact in a spectacle aptly named “Kiss The Air!” Comment
Film

I Enjoy Being a Boy

Out French filmmaker Céline Sciamma scored a hit in 2007 with her drama “Water Lilies” about female teenagers exploring their sexuality. Sciamma explores a different aspect of young female sexuality in her new film, “Tomboy,” a character study of a ten-year-old girl who spends a lot of time passing as a boy. Comment
Theater

Not-So-Pleasantville

Are you one of those people who can sync their iPhones with their iPads, but can’t get in sync with true happiness? Do you wonder if, instead of controlling your technological devices, they’re starting to control you? Is the instant gratification from ordering a week’s worth of groceries –– or a sex hookup –– with just a few taps on a keyboard and having them magically appear at your door within minutes starting to feel, well, less than gratifying? Comment
Theater

Not-So-Pleasantville

Are you one of those people who can sync their iPhones with their iPads, but can’t get in sync with true happiness? Do you wonder if, instead of controlling your technological devices, they’re starting to control you? Is the instant gratification from ordering a week’s worth of groceries –– or a sex hookup –– with just a few taps on a keyboard and having them magically appear at your door within minutes starting to feel, well, less than gratifying? Comment
Theater

The Hurt Krapp

Maybe 30 years from now, people will look back at YouTube videos they posted in 2011 to recover some sense of who they were and who they are. When Samuel Beckett wrote “Krapp’s Last Tape” in 1958 — five years after he burst on the theater scene with “Waiting for Godot” — the technology du jour was the home tape recorder and his protagonist uses it to record birthday reflections annually. As this production from Dublin's Gate Theatre demonstrates, it is a risky business. Comment
Nightlife

Linda, Bunny & Liz

Linda Lavin, besides being one of the great theatrical presences of our time, has always sung. She makes that point abundantly clear with her new CD, “Possibilities” (Ghostlight/ Sh-k-boom), which she debuted at Birdland on December 5. It’s a swinging conglomeration of some of my favorite songs ever written, including Jobim’s “Quiet Nights” and Mancini’s “Two for the Road” –– which will certainly be my wedding theme if I ever… Comment
Theater

The Marriage-Go-Round

Marriage in Noel Coward’s plays is no fairytale. As a gay man, marriage for Coward in real life was unthinkable in 1930, and so he took the role left to him — that of a gimlet-eyed outsider who devoted himself to skewering the conventions and accepted artifice of the conventional marriage state, which when fueled by alcohol, selfishness, but also wit, create a mix too volatile not to combust. Comment
Theater

Occupy The Armory!

New Yorkers may have to wait a little while to see Elizabeth Streb’s Extreme Action daredevils scale and drop from the Brooklyn Bridge, but in the meantime, the Park Avenue Armory’s 55,000-square-foot, 70-foot-high Wade Thompson Drill Hall will provide ample room for the master’s explorations of gravity, velocity, trajectory, distance, size, connectivity, and impact in a spectacle aptly named “Kiss The Air!” Comment
Nightlife

Linda, Bunny & Liz

Linda Lavin, besides being one of the great theatrical presences of our time, has always sung. She makes that point abundantly clear with her new CD, “Possibilities” (Ghostlight/ Sh-k-boom), which she debuted at Birdland on December 5. It’s a swinging conglomeration of some of my favorite songs ever written, including Jobim’s “Quiet Nights” and Mancini’s “Two for the Road” –– which will certainly be my wedding theme if I ever… Comment
Theater

Protest Operas Occupy Lincoln Center

Opera is usually considered a cultural repository of older works that glorify the ideals and delve into the obsessions of past generations. Comment
Theater

The Marriage-Go-Round

Marriage in Noel Coward’s plays is no fairytale. As a gay man, marriage for Coward in real life was unthinkable in 1930, and so he took the role left to him — that of a gimlet-eyed outsider who devoted himself to skewering the conventions and accepted artifice of the conventional marriage state, which when fueled by alcohol, selfishness, but also wit, create a mix too volatile not to combust. Comment
Film

Who’s Afraid of Penelope Longstreet?

This may be a perverse thing to say, but “Carnage” is so entertaining that it weakens its central argument. It plays like Edward Albee’s classic “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” rewritten by the staff of “Frasier” into something a little less threatening. Comment
Film

Who’s Afraid of Penelope Longstreet?

This may be a perverse thing to say, but “Carnage” is so entertaining that it weakens its central argument. It plays like Edward Albee’s classic “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” rewritten by the staff of “Frasier” into something a little less threatening. Comment
Film

Who’s Afraid of Penelope Longstreet?

This may be a perverse thing to say, but “Carnage” is so entertaining that it weakens its central argument. It plays like Edward Albee’s classic “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” rewritten by the staff of “Frasier” into something a little less threatening. Comment
Film

Who’s Afraid of Penelope Longstreet?

This may be a perverse thing to say, but “Carnage” is so entertaining that it weakens its central argument. It plays like Edward Albee’s classic “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” rewritten by the staff of “Frasier” into something a little less threatening. Comment
Nightlife

The Observer

I have never told an interviewee, “I’m grateful that you’re alive,” but that’s exactly what I did when I met writer Alan Hollinghurst at the Helmsley Hotel. His new novel, “The Stranger’s Child,” is his fifth, and I feel that I’ve grown up with him through all of them, every one of which has been marked by his pellucid gay sensibility, radiantly expressive prose, breathtaking turns of phrase and observations, and wonderfully pointed wit. Comment
Nightlife

Love! Valour! Confusion!

“Friends and Relations,” the comedic drama about a circle of gay friends that spins out of control, shares a tender kinship with Terrence McNally’s work. The unapologetic, warts-and-all portrayal of the elastic, often strained bonds among seven gay men recalls “Love! Valour! Compassion!” Attempting to chronicle New York’s 1970s sex and drug-fueled scene that gets quashed by the AIDS epidemic in the ‘80s, the play echoes the epic sweep of “Some Men.” Comment

Classifieds

Schneps Community News Group

Don’t miss out!

Stay in touch with your community. Subscribe to our free newsletter: