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I Enjoy Being a Boy

Out French filmmaker Céline Sciamma scored a hit in 2007 with her drama “Water Lilies” about female teenagers exploring their sexuality. Sciamma explores a different aspect of young female sexuality in her new film, “Tomboy,” a character study of a ten-year-old girl who spends a lot of time passing as a boy. Comment

A Familiar Arc Freshly Drawn

The coming out and coming-of age story gets a welcome new voice in Dee Rees’ very fine feature “Pariah,” based on her 2007 film short of the same name. Comment
Arts

I Enjoy Being a Boy

Out French filmmaker Céline Sciamma scored a hit in 2007 with her drama “Water Lilies” about female teenagers exploring their sexuality. Sciamma explores a different aspect of young female sexuality in her new film, “Tomboy,” a character study of a ten-year-old girl who spends a lot of time passing as a boy. Comment
Nightlife

Linda, Bunny & Liz

Linda Lavin, besides being one of the great theatrical presences of our time, has always sung. She makes that point abundantly clear with her new CD, “Possibilities” (Ghostlight/ Sh-k-boom), which she debuted at Birdland on December 5. It’s a swinging conglomeration of some of my favorite songs ever written, including Jobim’s “Quiet Nights” and Mancini’s “Two for the Road” –– which will certainly be my wedding theme if I ever… Comment
Arts

Who’s Afraid of Penelope Longstreet?

This may be a perverse thing to say, but “Carnage” is so entertaining that it weakens its central argument. It plays like Edward Albee’s classic “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” rewritten by the staff of “Frasier” into something a little less threatening. Comment
Arts

Who’s Afraid of Penelope Longstreet?

This may be a perverse thing to say, but “Carnage” is so entertaining that it weakens its central argument. It plays like Edward Albee’s classic “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” rewritten by the staff of “Frasier” into something a little less threatening. Comment
Arts

Who’s Afraid of Penelope Longstreet?

This may be a perverse thing to say, but “Carnage” is so entertaining that it weakens its central argument. It plays like Edward Albee’s classic “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” rewritten by the staff of “Frasier” into something a little less threatening. Comment
Arts

Who’s Afraid of Penelope Longstreet?

This may be a perverse thing to say, but “Carnage” is so entertaining that it weakens its central argument. It plays like Edward Albee’s classic “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” rewritten by the staff of “Frasier” into something a little less threatening. Comment
Nightlife

The Observer

I have never told an interviewee, “I’m grateful that you’re alive,” but that’s exactly what I did when I met writer Alan Hollinghurst at the Helmsley Hotel. His new novel, “The Stranger’s Child,” is his fifth, and I feel that I’ve grown up with him through all of them, every one of which has been marked by his pellucid gay sensibility, radiantly expressive prose, breathtaking turns of phrase and observations, and wonderfully pointed wit. Comment
Nightlife

Art Flesh

Since the ‘50s, art cinema and sex have gone hand in hand. Back then, the commercial success of Ingmar Bergman’s “Summer with Monika” didn’t owe nearly as much to its prescient depiction of frustrated, rebellious youth or to praise from François Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard as to its brief glimpse of female nudity, which seems quite tame now. Comment
Arts

Coming and Going

"Shame,” directed by Steve McQueen (“Hunger”), aims to be an intense character study of Brandon (Michael Fassbender), a sex addict with intimacy issues. In fact, the film, which is getting buzz — and an NC-17 rating — for its sexual content, is not really about anything. Comment
Arts

Coming and Going

"Shame,” directed by Steve McQueen (“Hunger”), aims to be an intense character study of Brandon (Michael Fassbender), a sex addict with intimacy issues. In fact, the film, which is getting buzz — and an NC-17 rating — for its sexual content, is not really about anything. Comment
Theater

I Enjoy Being a Boy

Out French filmmaker Céline Sciamma scored a hit in 2007 with her drama “Water Lilies” about female teenagers exploring their sexuality. Sciamma explores a different aspect of young female sexuality in her new film, “Tomboy,” a character study of a ten-year-old girl who spends a lot of time passing as a boy. Comment
Arts

Good Intentions, Great Visuals

“Le Havre” is a very unusual film. While it’s been criticized as more of the same from director Aki Kaurismäki, a Finn working in France, it indulges extreme stylization to a point rarely seen since Todd Haynes’ “Far From Heaven.” Comment
Arts

A Warm Light’s Refraction

“Paul Goodman Changed My Life,” a documentary at times dry and surprisingly conventional given its iconoclastic and fascinating subject, could have been titled “Paul Goodman Changed Many Lives.” The film opens with friends, colleagues, students, and critics recounting their impressions of a man whom William F. Buckley, Jr. described as “a pacifist, bisexualist… anarchist, and a few other things.” Comment
Arts

A Strong Heart Is Broken

“In the Family” is a sensitive, earnest drama about a gay Asian-American man in Tennessee embroiled in a child custody battle. Written, produced, directed by, and starring the openly gay Patrick Wang, this modest film sometimes wields a heavy hand in broaching legal challenges facing same-sex couples, but its sincerity ensures that its intentions resonate. Comment
Arts

When Two Are The One

“The One” is a modest and endearing low budget comedy-drama about the romantic entanglements of three bright young New Yorkers. Daniel (Jon Prescott) is a self-proclaimed plain-vanilla straight guy — a college jock with a business school degree and a fiancée named Jen (Margaret Anne Florence). Comment
Arts

Flat Tuesday

There is nary a mention of Tennessee Williams himself in Tim Wolff’s disappointing documentary “The Sons of Tennessee Williams,” which chronicles five decades of gay Mardi Gras balls in New Orleans. Comment
Arts

Welcome Freshness in World Cinema

This year’s New York Film Festival lineup doubles as a snapshot of the current state of world cinema. Comment
Arts

Newsboys of The World Unite (The Journal, Too)

Harvey Fierstein Adapts 1992 “Newsies” into Disney musical at Paper Mill Comment
Arts

Nicolas Winding Refn’s film a play for US audience — and Ryan Gosling stardom  

Opening on 2,000 American screens, “Drive” is a bid for the American mainstream by Danish director Nicolas Winding Refn, whose past two films were made in the UK. Comment
Arts

Spending a Weekend Together One Night

Chris New, out gay Brit actor, plays a queer political artist Comment
Arts

Quiet Drive, But Lots of Roadkill

Nicolas Winding Refn’s film a play for US audience — and Ryan Gosling stardom Comment
Arts

People Hearing Without Listening

For anyone who has ever enjoyed the remarkable alcohol-fueled exchanges between gay “bitchy queen” Peter Hackett and “embittered redneck homophobe” Ray Huffman — captured on tape and circulated underground for decades — “Shut Up Little Man” will be music to their ears. Comment
Arts

Quiet Drive, But Lots of Roadkill

Opening on 2,000 American screens, “Drive” is a bid for the American mainstream by Danish director Nicolas Winding Refn, whose past two films were made in the UK. Comment
Arts

J. Edgar: Gay, Loved & Unredeemed

J. Edgar” is the most sympathetic freak show you’re likely to see this year. It’s also contradictory to the point of incoherence. Comment
Arts

A West Coast Ground Zero

Reports from the front in the Castro's war on AIDS Comment
Arts

When Militancy Was the New Black

‘60s radicalism viewed more credulously in Swedish doc than by US mainstream media Comment

A Filmmaker Taking Our Hand

Gay Thai filmmaker Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s Cannes award-winning film “Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives” concerns a dying man who is comforted by family and friends. As the film unfolds in six chapters, Boonmee (Thanapat Saisaymar) recalls his various incarnations — as animals, including a talking catfish, and as spirits. Comment

He is a Camera

Anyone who reads the New York Times Style Section knows Bill Cunningham’s work. This sly, shy photographer follows the trends — baggy trousers or polka dot dresses — for his “On the Street” collages, and he documents the who’s who of high society for his “Evening Hours” photo spreads. Comments (1)

What Mart Crowley Knew

The “Boys” in “Making the Boys” are those from Mart Crowley’s 1968 landmark play turned 1970 film, “The Boys in the Band.” Crayton Robey’s affectionate documentary traces Crowley’s life and work before, during, and since his controversial and astonishing success. Comment

Rendezvous With Destiny

Out gay Buddhist surrealists don’t come a dime a dozen. Comment

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