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/ Dance

Coming Up:

AGORA Noémie Lafrance’s latest site-specific dance takes place in McCarren Park pool, a 50,000 square foot empty space in Williamsburg. Entitled, “Agora,” and performed by 30 dancers to a multi-channel score with theatrical lighting, the work explores the phenomenon of agoraphobia as a social and physical reaction to urban architecture. Main Arch, Lorimer St. btwn. Driggs & Bayard Aves. Advance tickets $20 and $35 ($25 and $40 at the door); students/Seniors $15 ($18 at the door) Children under 12 $5 ($7 at the door). Sep. 13-17 & 20-24 8 p.m. 718-302-5024 or sensproduction.org.

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MAKEDA THOMAS/DANCE PROJECTS Makeda Thomas as resident choreographer of Companhia Nacional De Canta E Dança of Moçambique will present two works, "Subtle Changes/The Talented" and "A Sense of Place," a new interdisciplinary dance work anchored by a series of conversations with young women living with HIV/AIDS in Mozambique. Music by Philip Hamilton, Zen One, and Charlie Mingus. The event will be kicked off with a greeting and introduction by Urban Bush Women founder/artistic director Jawole Willa Jo Zollar, with a post-performance benefit reception at the South African restaurant Madiba. BAM Hillman Attic Studio. 30 Lafayette Ave. in Brooklyn. $20 at 212-352-3101 or theatermania.com. Sep. 14 at 7 p.m.

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THE WOOSTER GROUP The company’s latest work “Poor Theater,” directed by Elizabeth LeCompte, is an homage to the work of three seminal figures in 20th century art—theater director Jerzy Grotowski, choreographer William Forsythe, and visual artist Max Ernst. The Performing Garage, 33 Wooster St. $25-$30 at 212-868-4444 or smarttixx.com. Tue.–Sun., 8 p.m. through Oct. 15.

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BILL T. JONES/ARNIE ZANE DANCE COMPANY What does it mean to be patriotic? Whom does patriotism serve? The meaning of honor, sacrifice, and duty are explored in the activist choreograp­her’s newest work, “BLIND DATE.” Alexander Kasser Theater at Montclair State University, College Avenue at Red Hawk Road. $35 at montclair.edu/kasser or 973-655-5112. Sep. 21, 23 & 24 7:30 p.m.

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Recently Noted:

DAVID NEUMANN/ADVANCED BEGINNER GROUP “Tough, the tough,” David Neumann’s humorous vision of a utilitarian humanity first performed last April returns to Danspace Project at St. Mark’s Church for a well-earned reprise. Neumann’s Groucho Marxist Everyman, dressed in dark blue coveralls, introduces us to the indecisive movement vocabulary that accompanies text by playwright Will Eno, which proclaims in a 1960s documentary-style voice that, “Mankind is staying around.” A martial arts sensibility characterizes the dance phrases, in which functional gestures, cheeky poses, swatting, muttering, long lines, and deep, moving plies suggest a purpose to the aimless action. Acting is a big part of what goes on in Neumann’s work. He and his cast of unusual performers are charming and draw the watcher into their unisex world of auto-mechanics, full of sound gags, vaudevillian physicality and pathos. Sep. 15-18 8:30 p.m. $15 or TDF/v. at 212 674-8194 or danspaceproject.org. (Brian McCormick)

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DR. SEX Larry Bortniker has written the score and with Sally Deering the book for a new musical comedy about the loving relationshiop amond Dr. Albred Kinsey (Brian Noonan), his wife Clara (Jennifer Simard), and Wally, their boyfriend and the good doctor’s lab assistant. (Christohoper Corts). It’s fun, sweet, surprisingly clean, and way screwball. Pamela Hunt directs. In previews, for Sep. 15 opening. Through Oct. 30. Peter Norton Space, 555 W. 42nd St.. $70 at 212-279-4200 or ticketcentral.com

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AN IDEAL HUSBAND This sharply intelligent comedic farce by Oscar Wilde that explores the potential downfall of Sir Robert Chiltern, a respected and seemingly irreproachable politician in danger of being exposed for a scandalous past, is a biting social commentary on false morality in the Victorian Age—and today. American Theatre of Actor’s Sergeant Theatre, 314 West 54th St., fourth fl., through Sep. 17, Mon.-Sat. 8 p.m., $15/ $10 at 212-769-8465.

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IN THE CONTINUUM Nikkole Slater and Danai Gurira have written and star in a new play about the devastation that HIV and AIDS are causing both for women in Africa and for African-American women—from Zimbabwe to South Central Los Angeles. Robert O’Hara directs. Performances Wed. 8 p.m., Sun. 7:30 p.m. Sep. 11-Oct. 30. 59E59 Theaters, 59 E. 59th St.. $15 at 22-840-9705 or primarystages.com.

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MOTHER COURAGE Jean Cocteau Repertory, Ernest Johns, artistic director, presents a premier translation by Marc Bliztstein of Bertholt Brecht’s 1941 play with music, inspired by Nazi German’s invasion of Germany. Blitzstein, a gay playwright who died in 1964, also completed the world-renowned translation of Brecht’s “Three Penny Opera,” and wrote “ The Cradle Will Rock,” the famed 1930s plays that President Franklin Roosevelt’s WPA felt compelled to shut down for its leftist leanings. David Fuller directs. In previews, with the opening on Sep. 4. Runs through Oct. 8. Wed. 7 p.m.; Thu.-Sat. 8 p.m.; Sun. 3 p.m. Bouwerie Lane Theatre, 330 Bowery, btwn. Bond and East Second St.. $54.50 at 212-279-4200.

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YANK! A new musical by Joseph and David Zellnik that pays homage to the “it takes one of every kind to make a platoon” World War II films and the lyricism of Broadway’s Rogers and Hammerstein of that era also looks at the lives and loves of gay soldiers in that conflict. Doug Kreeger, who starred in last Spring’s Leopold and Loeb musical “Thrill Me” will star as Stu, a war photographer for Yank magazine. Seven performances only, Sep. 14-21. Becket Theatre, 410 W. 42nd St. $15 at 212-352-3101 or theatermania.com.

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MOTHER COURAGE Jean Cocteau Repertory, Ernest Johns, artistic director, presents the premiere of a translation by Marc Bliztstein of Bertholt Brecht’s 1941 play with music, inspired by Nazi German’s invasion of Germany. Blitzstein, a gay playwright who died in 1964, also completed the world-renowned translation of Brecht’s “Three Penny Opera,” and wrote “ The Cradle Will Rock,” the famed 1930s plays that President Franklin Roosevelt’s WPA felt compelled to shut down for its leftist leanings. David Fuller directs. Previews begin Aug. 26, with an opening on Sep. 4. Runs through Oct. 8. Wed. 7 p.m.; Thu.-Sat. 8 p.m.; Sun. 3 p.m. Bouwerie Lane Theatre, 330 Bowery, btwn. Bond and East Second St. Ticket are $54.50; 212-279-4200.

Recently noted:

DRUMSTUCK The charming and engaging company’s delightfully orchestrated pieces inspire one to hear and marvel at the complexity and beauty of the sounds being made. But don’t look too deep. “Drumstruck” is disappointing, and at some points disquieting, insisting on educating in a manner simplistic and condescending. Dodger Stages, 340 W, 50th St., 212-239-6200.

FRINGENYC As the spunky, indefatigable co-founder and producing artistic director of the New York Fringe Festival, Elena K. Holy has seen thousands of shows. “We got over 800 applications and accepted about 200 to be in this year’s festival,” Holy said. But how do they choose? Merit and talent are a given, as well as adding to the festival’s trademark mix of diversity. But there’s another, more elusive component. “It often comes down to passion,” explained Holy. Various venues, Aug. 12-28. 212-279-4488 or fringenyc.org. (David Kennerley)

OEDIPUS AT PALM SPRINGS When a play is called “Oedipus at Palm Springs” and is about four lesbians at a gay retreat, what “plot twist” could be really surprising? Part of the fun of this delightful new play by the Five Lesbian Brothers is watching how the outsized elements of Greek tragedy have been interpreted for mere mortals on the ground. New York Theater Workshop, 79 E. Fourth St., 212-239-6200. (Christopher Byrne)

Coming Up:

AN IDEAL HUSBAND This sharply intelligent comedic farce by Oscar Wilde that explores the potential downfall of Sir Robert Chiltern, a respected and seemingly irreproachable politician in danger of being exposed for a scandalous past, is a biting social commentary on false morality in the Victorian Age—and today. American Theatre of Actor’s Sergeant Theatre, 314 W. 54th St., fourth fl., Aug. 31-Sep. 17, Mon.-Sat. 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 / $10 212-769-8465.

MOTHER COURAGE Jean Cocteau Repertory, Ernest Johns, artistic director, presents a premier translation by Marc Bliztstein of Bertholt Brecht’s 1941 play with music, inspired by Nazi German’s invasion of Germany. Blitzstein, a gay playwright who died in 1964, also completed the world-renowned translation of Brecht’s “Three Penny Opera,” and wrote “ The Cradle Will Rock,” the famed 1930s plays that President Franklin Roosevelt’s WPA felt compelled to shut down for its leftist leanings. David Fuller directs. Previews begin Aug. 26, with an opening on Sep. 4. Runs through Oct. 8. Wed. 7 p.m.; Thu.-Sat. 8 p.m.; Sun. 3 p.m. Bouwerie Lane Theatre, 330 Bowery, btwn. Bond and East Second St. Ticket are $54.50; 212-279-4200.

Recently noted:

THE DEAR BOY There isn’t a performance that is anything less than well done. Each of the four actors in Dan O’Brien’s new play finds the center of his or her character and works with a commitment constantly intriguing. That’s good, because I haven’t got a clue what this play is about or what it is other than an extended character study. Second Stage Theatre Uptown, Broadway at 76th St.; 12-246-4422. (Christopher Byrne)

DRUMSTUCK The charming and engaging company’s delightfully orchestrated pieces inspire one to hear and marvel at the complexity and beauty of the sounds being made. But don’t look too deep. Drumstruck” is disappointing, and at some points disquieting, insisting on educating in a manner simplistic and condescending. Dodger Stages, 340 W, 50th St., 212-239-6200. (Christopher Byrne)

FRINGENYC As the spunky, indefatigable co-founder and producing artistic director of the New York Fringe Festival, Elena K. Holy has seen thousands of shows. “We got over 800 applications and accepted about 200 to be in this year’s festival,” Holy said. But how do they choose? Merit and talent are a given, as well as adding to the festival’s trademark mix of diversity. But there’s another, more elusive component. “It often comes down to passion,” explained Holy. Various venues, Aug. 12-28. 212-279-4488 or fringenyc.org. (David Kennerley)

LENNON How tragic that the most potent spirit of the Beatles should be so totally stifled by the lazy, incoherent, and infantile mess that is “Lennon,” the musical. The only positive thing that can be said about Don Scardino’s pathetic excuse for a Broadway show—with more than a little help from Yoko Ono Lennon, according to the program—is that they understand how the world works in 2005, and it’s a sad commentary indeed. The Broadhurst Theater, 235 W. 44th St.; 212-239-6200. (Christopher Byrne)

OEDIPUS AT PALM SPRINGS When a play is called “Oedipus at Palm Springs” and is about four lesbians at a gay retreat, what “plot twist” could be really surprising? Part of the fun of this delightful new play by the Five Lesbian Brothers is watching how the outsized elements of Greek tragedy have been interpreted for mere mortals on the ground. New York Theater Workshop, 79 E. Fourth St., 212-239-6200. (Christopher Byrne)

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Updated 5:17 pm, July 20, 2018
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